China Energy executives cancel West Virginia trip amid trade dispute

China Energy executives cancel West Virginia trip amid trade disputeA scheduled trip to West Virginia by executives from China Energy Investment Corp to discuss a planned $83.7 billion investment in the state has been canceled, the latest victim of a growing trade war between the United States and China. The investment by China Energy, which ranks among the world's largest power companies by asset value, was the biggest among a slew of deals signed during U.S. President Donald Trump's state visit to Beijing in November. Brian Anderson, director of the West Virginia University Energy Institute, told Reuters on Wednesday the executives were due to arrive in West Virginia last weekend to discuss where to invest in shale gas, power and petrochemical projects.



Trump backs down on separating immigrant children, legal problems remain

Trump backs down on separating immigrant children, legal problems remainU.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday backed down and abandoned his policy of separating immigrant children from their parents on the U.S.-Mexico border, after images of youngsters in cages sparked outrage at home and abroad. Trump signed an executive order requiring that immigrant families be detained together when they are caught entering the country illegally for as long as their criminal proceedings take. While the change may end a policy that drew a rebuke from Pope Francis and everyone else from human rights advocates to business leaders, it may also mean immigrant children remain in custody indefinitely.



Scores of South Asia asylum seekers held in Oregon: U.S. senator

Scores of South Asia asylum seekers held in Oregon: U.S. senatorAt least 72 South Asian asylum-seekers are being detained at a federal prison in Oregon after getting caught up in the Trump administration's "zero-tolerance" policy for illegal border-crossers, a U.S. Senator's office said on Wednesday. The detainees, held at the Sheridan Federal Corrections Institution, include 52 from India, 18 from Nepal and two from Bangladesh. All of them are single men, who flew into Mexico and crossed the border into the United States, said Sara Hottman, a spokeswoman for U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley, a Democrat.



U.S. nuclear expert departs White House in 'regular rotation': officials

U.S. nuclear expert departs White House in 'regular rotation': officialsThe Trump administration's top nuclear expert involved in talks on ending North Korea's nuclear weapons programs is leaving the White House as part of a regular rotation, three senior administration officials said on Wednesday. The expert, Andrea Hall, has already been replaced by Julie Bentz as acting senior director of the Weapons of Mass Destruction directorate at the National Security Council (NSC), another U.S. official said. Bentz has a doctorate in nuclear engineering, and has served three times previously on the National Security Council dealing with nuclear policy, the official said.



Organizer of deadly Virginia rally plans follow-up in Washington

Organizer of deadly Virginia rally plans follow-up in WashingtonThe organizer of a far-right rally last year in Charlottesville, Virginia, that turned deadly is planning to hold a rally near the White House in Washington on the first anniversary of the event, federal officials said on Wednesday. Jason Kessler filed an application last month and it has been approved to hold what he described as a "white civil rights rally" on Aug. 11-12, although a permit has not yet been issued, Mike Litterst, a spokesman for the National Park Service, said in an email. Kessler organized the Aug. 12, 2017 "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville that drew international attention when a suspected white nationalist crashed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing one woman.



Trump immigration order may not prevent some family separations: lawmakers

Trump immigration order may not prevent some family separations: lawmakersSeveral Republican members of the U.S. House of Representatives who were briefed by Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen on Wednesday about President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration said they do not know if it would prevent family separations during detentions longer than 20 days. In the briefing that lasted about 10 minutes, Nielsen explained the order Trump had signed an hour earlier to keep immigrant families together as they await immigration proceedings.



Flash floods punish Texas border towns, Gulf coast area

Flash floods punish Texas border towns, Gulf coast area(Reuters) - Heavy downpours lashed Texas' Gulf Coast and unleashed flash floods on Wednesday, submerging vehicles, swamping homes and forcing numerous water rescues in towns still recovering from last year's Hurricane Harvey. Residents waded shoulder deep through flood waters running down their streets in Mercedes, Texas, about 5 miles (8 km) north of the Mexico-U.S. border, while water was rising in nearby Weslaco. Some 121 miles northeast on the Texas Gulf coast, a flash flood watch was in effect for towns around Corpus Christi after more than a foot of rain had fallen, the National Weather Service said.



U.S. airlines ask government not to put separated migrant children on flights

U.S. airlines ask government not to put separated migrant children on flightsFour major U.S. airlines have asked the federal government not to use their flights to transport migrant children who have been separated from their parents as part of the Trump administration's policy on illegal immigration. American Airlines Group Inc, United Continental Holdings Inc and Frontier Airlines issued statements on Wednesday before U.S. President Donald Trump backed down from the policy and signed an executive order to end the immediate separation of families detained at the U.S.-Mexico border for entering the country illegally. "The family separation process that has been widely publicized is not at all aligned with the values of American Airlines - we bring families together, not apart," the company said.



U.S. will ask judge to allow illegal immigrant families to be held for more than 20 days

U.S. will ask judge to allow illegal immigrant families to be held for more than 20 daysThe U.S. Justice Department will ask a federal judge to modify a court settlement to allow authorities to detain illegal immigrant families together for more than 20 days, a department official said on Wednesday. "Right now we have the lawful authority to detain a family unit together for up to 20 days. What we are seeking with Judge Gee is a modification of that so we can detain beyond 20 days the entire family unit together," Gene Hamilton, counselor to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, said in a media briefing.



Speeding to auction record? 1962 Ferrari could fetch $45 million

Speeding to auction record? 1962 Ferrari could fetch $45 millionAuctioneers RM Sotheby's said on Wednesday that the red Ferrari was one of just 36 examples of the 250 GTO model built by the famed Italian car maker. It has been owned since 2000 by American car collector and Numerix software company chairman Dr. Greg Whitten, who has raced it in vintage events, the auction house said. "The GTO was essentially the final true road racer, marking the end of an era when drivers really got their hands dirty," RM Sotheby's car specialist Shelby Myers said in a statement.



ACLU to continue lawsuit over Trump policies toward immigrant families

ACLU to continue lawsuit over Trump policies toward immigrant families(Reuters) - The American Civil Liberties Union on Wednesday said it plans to continue pursuing its lawsuit challenging U.S. President Donald Trump's policies concerning the treatment of immigrant families trying to enter the country. The nonprofit plans to seek an order in the federal court in San Diego compelling the reunification of immigrant parents with their children, a lawyer for the ACLU said in a phone interview. The announcement came after Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order ending the separation of families and instead calling for the detention of parents and children together.



New York sues 3M, five others over toxic chemical contamination

New York sues 3M, five others over toxic chemical contaminationBy Jonathan Stempel NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York state sued 3M Co and five other companies to recover the cost of cleaning up environmental contamination caused by toxic chemicals in firefighting foam that they manufactured. Governor Andrew Cuomo and Attorney General Barbara Underwood said on Wednesday the lawsuit seeks more than $38.8 million plus punitive damages and is the first of its type by a U.S. state. New York said the use of the foam at five military and civilian airports in the state caused "extensive contamination" to nearby fish, soil and water and increased the risk to people of immune system damage and other health problems.



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