Trump, Sanders explore staging unusual presidential debate

Presumptive Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at news conference in Bismarck, North DakotaBy Emily Stephenson BISMARCK, N.D. (Reuters) - Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders on Thursday explored staging an unconventional U.S. presidential debate that would sideline Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton and create a television spectacle that could attract huge ratings. The two men - a billionaire and a democratic socialist - expressed interest in a one-on-one encounter in California even though Republican and Democratic presidential candidates traditionally do not debate each other until the parties have selected their nominees. "I'd love to debate Bernie," Trump told reporters in North Dakota, after he secured enough delegates to clinch the Republican presidential nomination.



Colorado governor's book raises Clinton veep speculation

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper shows off his socks--one with Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and the other with Republican candidate Donald Trump--before entering his former brewpub for a book signing event to mark the release of his autobiography Thursday, May 26, 2016, in Denver. Hickenlooper, who is term-limited, is doing book talk rounds this week, reviving speculation that he is positioning himself to join Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign ticket. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)DENVER (AP) — John Hickenlooper, Colorado's term-limited Democratic governor, released a candid autobiography and is doing the book talk rounds this week, reviving speculation that he is positioning himself to join Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign ticket.



Trump shifts to Clinton after claiming GOP delegate majority

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters during a campaign rally, at the Rimrock Auto Arena, in Billings, Mont., Thursday, May 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Presidential candidate Donald Trump, armed at last with a majority of the Republican Party's delegates, is celebrating by shifting his attention toward the general election while his likely Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, remains locked in a divisive primary contest.



Trump vows to undo Obama's climate agenda in appeal to oil sector

Presumptive Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at news conference in Bismarck, North DakotaBy Valerie Volcovici and Emily Stephenson BISMARCK, N.D. (Reuters) - Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, promised on Thursday to roll back some of America's most ambitious environmental policies, actions that he said would revive the ailing U.S. oil and coal industries and bolster national security. Among the proposals, Trump said he would pull the United States out of the U.N. global climate accord, approve the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada and rescind measures by President Barack Obama to cut U.S. emissions and protect waterways from industrial pollution. "Any regulation that's outdated, unnecessary, bad for workers or contrary to the national interest will be scrapped and scrapped completely," Trump told about 7,700 people at the Williston Basin Petroleum Conference in Bismarck, the capital of oil-rich North Dakota.



Quotations in the News
"I think he has touched a part of our electorate that doesn't like where our country is. I have no problem supporting Mr. Trump." — Oklahoma GOP chairwoman Pam Pollard, as Donald Trump sewed up the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican presidential nomination.

British PM Cameron says happy to meet Trump but no dates fixed
ISE-SHIMA, Japan (Reuters) - Prime Minister David Cameron said on Friday that no dates had been fixed for a potential visit by Donald Trump to Britain but that he would be happy to meet the presumptive Republican presidential nominee if he did visit. "Often these candidates chose to come through various European countries in the run up to the U.S. elections. No dates are fixed but I am always happy to meet people on that basis," Cameron told reporters at the G7.

Cameron says happy to meet Trump but no dates fixed
ISE-SHIMA, Japan (Reuters) - Prime Minister David Cameron said on Friday that no dates had been fixed for a potential visit by Donald Trump to Britain but that he would be happy to meet the presumptive Republican presidential nominee if he did visit. "Often these candidates chose to come through various European countries in the run up to the U.S. elections. No dates are fixed but I am always happy to meet people on that basis," Cameron told reporters at the G7.

Trump, Le Pen, Brexiteer Johnson dubbed a 'horror' show as EU chiefs weigh in

A mural of Donald Trump embracing Boris Johnson is seen on a building in BristolBy Alastair Macdonald and Minami Funakoshi BRUSSELS/ISE-SHIMA, Japan (Reuters) - A top EU official on Thursday called possible victories for Donald Trump and Brexit campaigner Boris Johnson part of a "horror scenario" for the world, along with far-right leader Marine Le Pen potentially becoming French president. The tweet by Brussels' most powerful civil servant came shortly after the EU's chief executive accused former London mayor Johnson of distorting the truth in trying to persuade Britons to leave the European Union. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker noted during a news conference at the Group of Seven summit in Japan that Johnson once lived in the EU capital.



Trump lays claim to Republican presidential nomination

Presumptive Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has now secured the backing of 1,238 delegates, one more than the 1,237 needed, according to the Associated PressWhite House hopeful Donald Trump claimed victory in the Republican nomination race, while shrugging off criticism from the man he aims to replace, President Barack Obama, who blasted the billionaire's ignorance and arrogant attitude. Trump vaulted past the threshold of 1,237 needed to win the party's primary race when a group of unbound delegates from North Dakota said they would back him. The accomplishment caps an extraordinary rise by a political neophyte whose campaign was widely derided as a distraction and a publicity stunt last June, when Trump announced his candidacy.



Push for encryption law falters despite Apple case spotlight

A worker checks an iPhone in a repair store in New YorkBy Dustin Volz, Mark Hosenball and Joseph Menn WASHINGTON/ SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - After a rampage that left 14 people dead in San Bernardino, key U.S. lawmakers pledged to seek a law requiring technology companies to give law enforcement agencies a "back door" to encrypted communications and electronic devices, such as the iPhone used by one of the shooters. Draft legislation that Senators Richard Burr and Dianne Feinstein, the Republican and Democratic leaders of the Intelligence Committee, had circulated weeks ago likely will not be introduced this year and, even if it were, would stand no chance of advancing, the sources said. Key among the problems was the lack of White House support for legislation in spite of a high-profile court showdown between the Justice Department and Apple Inc over the suspect iPhone, according to Congressional and Obama Administration officials and outside observers.



Moments from Trump's rise in chaotic GOP race, now settled

Moments from Trump's rise in chaotic GOP race, now settledWASHINGTON (AP) — The nicknames. The outrage. The rallies — and the protests.



'Barking mad' Trump looms over Australian election campaign

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull stands outside Australia's Parliament House in Canberra May 4, 2016 following the announcement Australia's 2016-17 Federal BudgetBy Jane Wardell SYDNEY (Reuters) - Donald Trump cast his highly coiffed shadow over the Australian election on Friday when Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull rebuked his challenger for calling the U.S. Republican party's presumptive presidential nominee "barking mad". Australian Opposition leader Bill Shorten called Trump's success in securing enough delegates to clinch the Republican party's presidential nomination the "ultimate victory of celebrity politics". "I think Donald Trump's views are just barking mad on some issues," Shorten told Hot 100, a radio station in the tropical northern city of Darwin.



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