Dismissing risks, Trump goes all-in on Bill Clinton's past

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, in Bedford, N.H. (AP Photo/John Locher)NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump says he took the moral high ground at the first presidential debate by not mentioning the infidelities of former President Bill Clinton. But he hinted at them, talked about them immediately afterward and then sent his campaign's top backers out to do the same.



Clinton says Trump may have violated U.S. law on Cuba

Trump holds a rally with supporters in Bedford, New Hampshire, U.S.U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton said on Thursday that Republican opponent Donald Trump may have violated U.S. law, following a news report that one of his companies attempted to do business in Cuba. Newsweek said on Thursday that a hotel and casino company controlled by Trump secretly conducted business with Cuba that was illegal under U.S. sanctions in force during Fidel Castro's presidency of the Communist-ruled island.



Houston taco trucks register voters as Latinos flex political muscle

A voter registration sign is seen on a taco truck in HoustonBy Terry Wade HOUSTON (Reuters) - Taco trucks in Houston have begun doubling as voter registration sites as Latinos in Texas flex their political muscle before the Nov. 8 presidential election in a state that has long symbolized Mexican immigration to the United States. Riffing on widely ridiculed comments by Marco Gutierrez, a supporter of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, that without action on immigration reform, "you're going to have taco trucks on every corner," the non-partisan civic group Mi Familia Vota is driving the effort to reach first-time voters.



Do not vote for 'demagogue' Trump, USA Today tells its readers

Trump holds a rally with supporters in Council Bluffs, Iowa, U.S.Branding Donald Trump a "dangerous demagogue," USA Today on Thursday urged its readers not to vote for the Republican presidential candidate, but added that it was not endorsing his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton either. It went on to list and expand on eight reasons for its stance, including: "He is ill-equipped to be commander in chief," "He traffics in prejudice," and "He’s a serial liar." "Trump’s foreign policy pronouncements typically range from uninformed to incoherent," the editorial said. In an opinion piece on the USA Today website, Trump's running mate Mike Pence wrote that the New York businessman was "thoughtful, compassionate and steady... I know he is ready to lead the United States as our next president and commander in chief." Trump and Clinton are locked in a close race for the Nov. 8 election.



U.S. lawmakers may change Sept. 11 law after rejecting veto

U.S. Speaker of the House Ryan holds a news conference on Capitol Hill in WashingtonBy Patricia Zengerle and Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. lawmakers expressed doubts on Thursday about Sept. 11 legislation they forced on President Barack Obama, saying the new law allowing lawsuits against Saudi Arabia could be narrowed to ease concerns about its effect on Americans abroad. A day after a rare overwhelming rejection of a presidential veto, the first during Obama's eight years in the White House, the Republican leaders of the Senate and House of Representatives opened the door to fixing the law as they blamed the Democratic president for not consulting them adequately. "I do think it is worth further discussing," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters, acknowledging that there could be "potential consequences" of the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act, known as JASTA.



U.S. lawmakers may change September 11 law after rejecting veto

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks at the Republican National Convention in ClevelandBy Patricia Zengerle and Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. lawmakers expressed doubts on Thursday about Sept. 11 legislation they forced on President Barack Obama, saying the new law allowing lawsuits against Saudi Arabia could be narrowed to ease concerns about its effect on Americans abroad. A day after a rare overwhelming rejection of a presidential veto, the first during Obama's eight years in the White House, the Republican leaders of the Senate and House of Representatives opened the door to fixing the law as they blamed the Democratic president for not consulting them adequately. "I do think it is worth further discussing," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters, acknowledging that there could be "potential consequences" of the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act, known as JASTA.



In Charlotte, police shooting affects presidential politics

FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2106 file photo, demonstrators protest the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, N.C. The killing of Keith Lamont Scott by a Charlotte police officer, and the demonstrations that followed, reverberate beyond this city, illuminating existing dividing lines in a state that will help decide whether Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump wins the presidency. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — The killing of a black man by a Charlotte police officer, and the sometimes violent protests that followed, have intensified the political divide in a state crucial to deciding whether Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump wins the presidency.



Clinton, Trump barnstorm Iowa as early voting begins

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton takes a selfie during an Iowa Democratic party early vote rally September 29, 2016 in Des Moines, IowaHillary Clinton campaigned Thursday in Iowa as early voting began in the pivotal swing state, seeking to pry it away from Republican Donald Trump and spur turnout that could ultimately decide the presidency. The businessman-turned-populist stumped in Iowa a day earlier, appealing to white, blue-collar workers who have helped push him into the lead in the Hawkeye State, where the latest polls put him up nearly five points. Iowa has long been an essential staging post on the path to the White House.



Obama to speak at funeral of Israel's Peres: White House
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama on Thursday departed for Israel, where he will speak at the funeral of former Israeli leader Shimon Peres, the White House said. Obama will lead a delegation of 32 other U.S. officials, including former President Bill Clinton, Secretary of State John Kerry, Democratic Senator Bob Casey and Nancy Pelosi, Democratic leader in the House of Representatives. The delegation was dominated by Democrats, but three Republican lawmakers were included among the 19 U.S. lawmakers, the White House said. ...

Senator McConnell: Saudi bill may have unintended consequences
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Thursday there could be unintended consequences from legislation allowing relatives of Sept. 11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia. "It appears there may be some unintended ramification of that (the law) and I do think it is worth further discussing," Republican McConnell told reporters. Congress on Wednesday overwhelmingly rejected President Barack Obama's veto of the legislation. (Reporting by Susan Cornwell; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe)

Trump wanted only 'pretty ones' at golf club: employees

View of the Trump National Golf Club in Rancho Palos Verdes, CaliforniaRepublican presidential nominee Donald Trump suggested management at his golf club in California fire less attractive female employees, the Los Angeles Times reported on Thursday, citing court records. The paper said staff at the Trump National Golf Club in Rancho Palos Verdes were so concerned about the mogul's repeated calls for attractive hostesses that they made sure "young, thin, pretty women" were scheduled to work on the days he visited. "I had witnessed Donald Trump tell managers many times while he was visiting the club that restaurant hostesses were not 'pretty enough' and that they should be fired and replaced with more attractive women," Hayley Strozier, who worked at the club until 2008, says in the court documents related to a lawsuit filed by employees who said they were denied breaks at the facility.



France's Ayrault says Donald Trump's foreign policy 'very confused'

France's Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault leave 10 Carlton House Terrace in central London, where representatives from Britain, China, France and energy company EDF signed an agreement to build and operate a new nuclear power station at Hinkley PointFrance's foreign minister took a swipe at U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on Thursday calling his foreign policy objectives "confused" and warning that Paris could not forget remarks made after militant attacks in France. Trump's campaign has been marked by insults and inflammatory rhetoric to deal with radical Islam, while on international affairs he has put into question U.S. policy on everything from Syria to Iran, Mexico and North Korea. "I don't know what Donald Trump's foreign policy is as it's very confused," Jean-Marc Ayrault said in an interview with U.S. broadcaster CNN.



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