New Hampshire votes in first US presidential primary

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Manchester, New Hampshire, on February 8, 2016New Hampshire began voting on Tuesday in the first US presidential primary with Republican Donald Trump calling on supporters to propel him to victory and Democrat Bernie Sanders primed to upstage Hillary Clinton. The northeastern state, home to just 1.3 million people, sets the tone for the primaries and could shake out a crowded Republican field of candidates pitting Trump and arch-conservative Senator Ted Cruz against more establishment candidates led by Senator Marco Rubio. Sanders took four votes to none for Clinton, while Republican Ohio Governor John Kasich received three to Trump's two.



Trump, Sanders look to emerge from New Hampshire with wins

A supporter holds Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump's book during a campaign rally Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/David Goldman)MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders hope to emerge from New Hampshire's primary Tuesday with their first wins of the 2016 presidential election, victories that would boost credibility for both of these breakout campaigns.



Rubio needs strong New Hampshire showing to rebut debate critics

Republican U.S. presidential candidate Marco Rubio speaks to supporters at a rally in NashuaBy James Oliphant MANCHESTER, N.H. (Reuters) - A week ago, it looked like the stars were aligning for Marco Rubio. Now, as New Hampshire holds its pivotal primary on Tuesday, the Republican presidential contender has to hope the sky does not come crashing down on him. After a surprisingly strong third-place showing in last week’s Iowa caucuses, Rubio came into New Hampshire hoping for a top-tier finish in the state to buttress his argument he is the candidate around whom the party establishment should rally.



Obama to release $4 trillion-plus budget for 2017

FILE - In this Feb. 5, 2016 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama is asking Congress for more than $1.8 billion in emergency funding to help fight the Zika virus. In an announcement Monday, the White House said the money would be used to expand mosquito control programs, speed development of a vaccine, develop diagnostic tests and improve support for low-income pregnant women. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is unveiling his eighth and final budget, a $4 trillion-plus proposal that's freighted with liberal policy initiatives and new and familiar tax hikes — all sent to a dismissive Republican-controlled Congress that simply wants to move on from his presidency.



AP News Guide: Snowy New Hampshire has its say in 2016 race

A countdown shows one day left before the New Hampshire primary at the headquarters for Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., in Manchester, N.H., Monday Feb. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — You may have heard about the establishment lane in the 2016 presidential campaign, the outsider lane and more. What the Republican candidates really want from the New Hampshire primary is an express lane out of the traffic jam that is the GOP contest.



Candidates sprint to NH finish, but brace for long campaign

Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush throws a snowball following a campaign event, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Nashua, N.H. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)SALEM, N.H. (AP) — Eyeing their first wins in a capricious campaign, Republican Donald Trump lashed out at his opponents Monday while Democrat Bernie Sanders sought to play it safe on the eve of the nation's initial primary. GOP contenders vying for second and third saw fresh hopes for survival after New Hampshire as both parties settled in for a drawn-out slog to the nomination.



Obama lays out 2017 spending priorities in final White House budget

U.S. President Obama answers a reporter's question after delivering a statement on the economy in the press briefing room at the White House in WashingtonBy Jeff Mason WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama unveils his final White House budget on Tuesday with a blueprint for fiscal year 2017 that will lay out his spending proposals for priorities from fighting Islamic State to providing for the poor. The budget for the fiscal year beginning on Oct. 1 is largely a political document and is unlikely to be passed by the Republican-controlled Congress. "That document ... will be President Obama's final vision of how he lays out the fiscal future for the country," said Joel Friedman, vice president for federal fiscal policy at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.



U.S. judge again denies Texas request to bar Syrian refugees
By Jon Herskovitz AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - A U.S. judge denied for the second time a request by Texas to bar relief agencies from bringing Syrian refugees into the state, a decision that could have a bearing on the attempts of 30 other governors to block refugees from their states. U.S. District Judge David Godbey said the Republican leaders who have fought the resettlement have not shown Texas would suffer irreparable harm. The same judge rejected in December the state's request for a restraining order saying the evidence presented was "largely speculative hearsay." "The Court does not deny that the Syrian refugees pose some risk.

Arizona panel OKs tax credit for concealed carry permit
Arizona residents are one step closer to getting a tax credit for attending a firearms safety class after Republican lawmakers passed a measure offering a dollar-for-dollar credit for concealed-carry permit ...

Before New Hampshire primary, Trump campaign shows mellower side
By James Oliphant PLYMOUTH, N.H. (Reuters) - U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump came to the small town of Plymouth in the New Hampshire mountains on Sunday and promised to lower prescription drug prices, improve education and help heroin addicts get treatment. It was a day after he told a Republican debate audience that he did not want to leave poor people “dying in the streets,” and won praise by some pundits for delivering a restrained performance in which he largely avoided skewering his rivals. It is not as if Trump, notorious for his inflammatory, demolition-derby style, has suddenly gone soft.

Potential New Hampshire spoiler Kasich could pose threat to Rubio

U.S. Republican presidential candidate John Kasich speaks to voters during a campaign town hall in NashuaBy Emily Stephenson and Amanda Becker MANCHESTER, N.H. (Reuters) - U.S. Republican presidential candidate John Kasich is polling in the low single digits nationally but may be poised to play the role of spoiler in Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary by cutting into the support of higher-profile rivals such as Marco Rubio.     The Ohio governor, who is vowing to erase the U.S. budget deficit without shredding the safety net for poor Americans, has built a base of support among moderate Republicans and independent voters, who wield special clout in New Hampshire because they can vote in either party's primary. Kasich, 63, has the support of about 12 to 14 percent of New Hampshire’s voters in recent polls. The former congressman has staked the viability of his White House aspirations on New Hampshire, whose pivotal primary is part of the state-by-state contests to pick the party nominees for the Nov. 8 election to replace Democratic President Barack Obama.



Ex-NY mayor Bloomberg considering presidential bid

Michael Bloomberg, pictured on June 30, 2015, told the Financial Times he was "looking at all options" when asked whether he is considering a presidential runMichael Bloomberg, the former New York mayor and billionaire media owner, has stated for the first time that he is considering launching a White House bid this year. The move would thoroughly upend a presidential race that has already kicked into high gear, as Republicans and Democrats battle it out for prominence in Tuesday's crucial New Hampshire primary. Bloomberg, who mulled running in previous elections and has criticized the quality of debate in the 2016 race, told the Financial Times he was "looking at all options" when asked whether he was considering throwing his hat in the ring.



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