Vermont's Sanders kicks off 2016 bid

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 in Burlington, Vt., where he formally announced he will seek the Democratic nomination for president. (AP Photo/Andy Duback)Challenging Hillary Clinton from the left, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders kicked off his presidential bid Tuesday with a pitch to liberals to join him in a "political revolution" to transform the nation's economy and politics.



Floodwaters deepen in Houston after city gets more rain

Rescue personnel grab the the hand of a man stranded in rushing water at the northwest corner of Lamar Blvd. and 15th St. in Austin, Texas. Shoal Creek overflowed its banks and inundated the major traffic artery with rushing water. Several cars were stalled under and near the 15th St. bridge Monday, May 25, 2015. (Alberto Martinez/Austin American-Statesman via AP)Officials have confirmed 11 deaths so far in holiday weekend storms in Oklahoma and Texas.



What would White House be like without a dog?

Every president since Theodore Roosevelt has had a dog in the White House, and almost certainly the next one will, too —unless it’s Bernie Sanders.



Cleveland, Justice Department announce police settlement

FILE - In this May 23, 2015, file photo, riot police stand in formation as a protest forms against the acquittal of Michael Brelo, a patrolman charged in the shooting deaths of two unarmed suspects in Cleveland. The city of Cleveland has reached a settlement with the U.S. Justice Department over a pattern of excessive force and civil rights violations by its police department, and the agreement could be announced as soon as Tuesday, May 26, 2015, a senior federal law enforcement official said. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Cleveland officials and the U.S. Justice Department on Tuesday announced their settlement over a pattern of excessive force and civil rights violations by the city's police department.



Appeals panel won't lift hold on Obama immigration action

Court won't lift hold on Obama immigration actionNEW ORLEANS (AP) — President Barack Obama's plan to shield as many as 5 million immigrants living in the U.S. from deportation remained on hold Tuesday after a federal appeals court panel refused to allow it to take effect immediately.



Storms kill 16 in Texas, Oklahoma; Houston flooded

An American flag, a remnant of Memorial Day holiday waves despite being caught in a tree in San Marcos, TexasBy Kristen Hays and Amanda Orr HOUSTON (Reuters) - Torrential rains have killed at least 16 people in Texas and Oklahoma, including four in Houston where floods turned streets into rivers and led to about 1,000 calls for help in the fourth-most populous U.S. city, officials said on Tuesday. The death toll is set to rise with numerous people still missing in Texas after the storms slammed the states during the Memorial Day weekend, causing record floods that destroyed hundreds of homes, swept away bridges, and even unearthed a coffin from a Houston cemetery. "A lot of folks drove their car into high water and had to abandon those vehicles," Mayor Annise Parker said at a news conference.



Data thieves gain access to 100,000 U.S. taxpayers' information: IRS

United States Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen appears before a hearing in Washington(Reuters) - Tax return information for about 100,000 U.S. taxpayers was illegally accessed by cyber criminals over the past four months, U.S. IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said on Tuesday, the latest in a series of data thefts that have alarmed American consumers. From February to May, attackers sought to gain access to personal tax information 200,000 times through the agency's "Get Transcript" online application, which calls up information from previous returns, he told a news conference. The breach did not affect any IRS data outside the "Get Transcript" application, and the agency said it would strengthen its security measures.



Colorado movie gunman wrote of 'obsession to kill' since childhood

Colorado shooting suspect James Eagan Holmes makes his first court appearance in AuroraBy Keith Coffman CENTENNIAL, Colo., (Reuters) - Colorado cinema gunman James Holmes wrote in a notebook he sent to his psychiatrist prior to opening fire in a suburban theater that he had harbored an "obsession to kill" since childhood, a police officer testified at his murder trial on Tuesday. Holmes mailed a package to the psychiatrist that included the notebook a day before he opened fire inside a cinema in the Denver suburb of Aurora during a screening of the Batman film "The Dark Knight Rises." Prosecutors have said they will seek the death penalty for Holmes if he is convicted of killing 12 moviegoers and wounding 70 others in the July 2012 rampage. Aurora Police Sergeant Matthew Fyles read aloud excerpts from the 29-page notebook, in which Holmes allegedly wrote: "The obsession to kill since I was a kid, with age became more realistic." Fyles said that Holmes wrote in another entry that he had thought about multiple ways to kill, including with nuclear weapons and biological warfare.



Joint Chiefs Chairman says U.S. blindsided by fall of Mosul

Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 6, 2015, before the Senate Appropriations Committee hearing to review the Fiscal Year 2016 funding request and budget justification for the Defense Department. Dempsey and Defense Secretary Ash Carter said setting up a humanitarian safe zone for those caught in the crossfire in Syria can be done militarily, but would require a significant policy decision on the part of the Obama administration. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)Gen. Martin Dempsey admits in a new documentary that the Pentagon did no contingency planning for the Islamic State advance.



Governor says deadly flooding is worst ever seen in Texas area

San Marcos Firefighter Jay Horton rescues a woman from in flood waters in San Marcos TexasBy Jim Forsyth SAN ANTONIO (Reuters) - Texas Governor Greg Abbott on Monday likened the ferocity of flash flooding that killed at least three people to a tsunami, and authorities said a dam had given way in a state park. Abbott declared states of disaster in 24 counties and flew over the area south of Austin to assess the damage caused by tornadoes, heavy rainfall, thunderstorms and flooding that forced evacuations and rooftop rescues and left thousands of residents without electricity. "This is the biggest flood this area of Texas has ever seen," Abbott said.



Iraq begins operation to oust Islamic State from Anbar

Local residents and Sunni tribal fighters welcome newly-arriving Iraqi Shiite Hezbollah Brigade militiamen, brandishing their flag, who are joining the fight against Islamic State group militants in Khalidiya, 100 kilometers (60 miles) west of Baghdad, Iraq. (AP Photo)BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq vowed Tuesday to retake Anbar province — now mostly held by the Islamic State — by launching a large-scale military operation less than two weeks after suffering a humiliating defeat at the hands of the extremists in the provincial capital of Ramadi.



Lawyer says allegations B.B. King was poisoned 'ridiculous'

Patty King leaves a memorial service for her father B.B. King Saturday, May 23, 2015, in Las Vegas. Friends and family members gathered Saturday at a funeral home in Las Vegas to remember the Blues legend. (AP Photo/John Locher)LAS VEGAS (AP) — Two B.B. King heirs who've been most outspoken about the blues legend's care in his final days have accused King's two closest aides of poisoning him, but the attorney for King's estate called the claims ridiculous and police said there was no active homicide investigation.



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