Trump Says Anybody Voting Democrat ‘Is Crazy’ At Arizona Rally

Trump Says Anybody Voting Democrat ‘Is Crazy’ At Arizona RallyPresident Donald Trump declared that anyone voting for Democrats in the 2018



'Compelling Evidence' Points To Saudi Prince In Khashoggi Death, Says Ex-MI6 Chief

'Compelling Evidence' Points To Saudi Prince In Khashoggi Death, Says Ex-MI6 ChiefThe former head of Britain's foreign intelligence service MI6 believes "very



Japan's Biggest Bank CEO Joins Exodus From Saudi Forum

Japan's Biggest Bank CEO Joins Exodus From Saudi ForumMUFG Bank Ltd. CEO Kanetsugu Mike won’t attend the Future Investment Initiative conference that begins Tuesday, spokesman Kazunobu Takahara said Sunday by phone, without giving a reason for his withdrawal. Eiichi Yoshikawa, deputy president of the unit of Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group Inc., will go instead, Takahara said.



Migrant caravan reforms in Mexico after thousands make desperate journey from Guatemala across river

Migrant caravan reforms in Mexico after thousands make desperate journey from Guatemala across riverA growing throng of Central American migrants resumed their advance toward the US border in southern Mexico on Sunday, overwhelming Mexican government attempts to stop them at the border. Their numbers swelled to about 5,000 overnight and at first light they started walking toward the Mexican town of Tapachula, 10 abreast in a line stretching approximately a mile (1.5 kilometres). Several hundred more already had applied for refugee status in Mexico and an estimated 1,500 were still on the Guatemalan side of the Suchiate River, hoping to enter legally. The decision to re-form the migrant caravan capped a day in which Mexican authorities again refused mass entry to migrants on the bridge, instead accepting small groups for asylum processing and giving out 45-day visitor permits to some.  Authorities handed out numbers for people to be processed in a strategy seen before at US border posts when dealing with large numbers of migrants. But many became impatient and circumventing the border gate, crossing the river on rafts, by swimming or by wading in full view of the hundreds of Mexican police manning the blockade on the bridge. Some paid locals the equivalent of $1.25 (£0.95) to ferry them across the muddy waters. They were not detained on reaching the Mexican bank. Migrants cite widespread poverty and gang violence in Honduras as their reasons for joining the caravan.  The caravan has triggered an increase in anti-immigrant rhetoric from Donald Trump, the US president, who has threatened to cut aid to the region, deploy the military and close the US-Mexico border if authorities do not stop the migrants. A Honduran migrant looks over the Suchiate River that separates Mexico from Guatemala Credit: AP Photo/Oliver de Ros At a rally on Saturday, he suggested the caravan was politically motivated. "The Democrats want caravans, they like the caravans. A lot of people say 'I wonder who started that caravan?'" he said in Elko, Nevada, where migration has become an issue in the upcoming US mid-term elections. Nevertheless, as they passed through Mexican villages on the outskirts of Ciudad Hidalgo, the caravan drew applause and donations of food and clothing. Maria Teresa Orellana, a resident of the neighborhood of Lorenzo handed out free sandals to the migrants as they passed. "It's solidarity," she said. "They're our brothers." On Sunday, federal police monitored the caravan's progress from a helicopter and had a few units escorting it. Outside Tapachula about 500 briefly gathered along the highway on buses and in patrol units, but officers said their instructions were to maintain traffic on the highway not stop the caravan.



Man who killed 3 in Colorado Walmart gets life in prison

Man who killed 3 in Colorado Walmart gets life in prisonBRIGHTON, Colo. (AP) — The man who gunned down three people in a suburban Denver Walmart last year was sentenced Friday to life in prison without parole. But more than 11 months after the crime, his motive remains a mystery.



New York witches aim hex at Supreme Court's Brett Kavanaugh despite death threats

New York witches aim hex at Supreme Court's Brett Kavanaugh despite death threats"It gives the people who are seeking agency a little bit of chance to have that back," Madara said. Seated at a desk phone among bird skulls and crystal balls at Catland Books, the occult shop she co-owns, Madara said the Kavanaugh hex is expected to be the most popular event the store has hosted since its 2013 opening, including spells aimed at President Donald Trump. Madara declined to provide details of what the latest ritual will entail.



US craze for DNA 'heritage' tests may bolster racism, critics warn

US craze for DNA 'heritage' tests may bolster racism, critics warnMillions of Americans are using DNA test kits sold online to research their ancestry, either out of simple curiosity or to find answers about their identity. In a country whose population, for the most part, arrived in various waves of migration -- and where genealogy has caught the public imagination -- the DNA tests have proven wildly successful. The main companies offering the service, Ancestry and 23andMe, say they have tested between 15 million people between them.



Israel delays eviction of West Bank Bedouin village

Israel delays eviction of West Bank Bedouin villageIsraeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Saturday postponed the forced eviction of a Bedouin village in the occupied West Bank, a government official said. The fate of Khan al-Ahmar has drawn international concern after Israel said it planned to raze the village, a ramshackle camp housing 180 residents. Its residents, backed by foreign activists who have gathered at the site, have been waiting for bulldozers to move in at any time after an Oct. 1 deadline from Israel for the villagers to demolish their own homes expired.



Taiwan rail crash kills 18 as train flips

Taiwan rail crash kills 18 as train flipsAt least 18 people were killed and 171 others injured on Sunday when one of Taiwan's newer, faster trains derailed on a curve along a popular weekend route, officials said. The Puyuma express train was carrying more than 366 passengers from a suburb of Taipei in the north toward Taitung, a city on Taiwan's southeast coast, when it went off the tracks at 4:50pm, the Taiwan central government said in a statement. Hours later, one of the train's eight cars was seen tipped over at about a 75-degree angle, with the entire right side destroyed. Firefighters with lights on their hard hats, fearing people may be trapped beneath the car, were looking underneath as a crane prepared to upend it. The National Fire Agency cited the Cabinet spokesman's office as saying 22 people were killed and 171 injured in the disaster, but then lowered the toll to 18 saying there had been a miscalculation. Some passengers were crushed to death, Ministry of National Defense spokesman Chen Chung-chi said. "Their train car turned over. They were crushed, so they died right away," General Chen said. Soldiers have been removing bodies to identify them, he added, but nightfall was complicating rescue work. Photos from the scene just south of the city of Luodong showed the train's eight cars in a zig-zag formation near the tracks. Five of the cars are turned over on their sides. The train fell in a zig-zag shape Credit: CNA PHOTO/AFP/Getty Images Most of the deaths were in the first car, which flipped over, a government spokesman said. It was unclear how many people may still be trapped in the train, said the spokesman, who spoke on customary condition of anonymity. Some 120 soldiers joined firefighters in their rescue work. On a live feed provided by Taiwan's United Daily News, rescuers were seen carefully carrying what appeared to be a body wrapped in white plastic away from the site. Local television reports said passengers were trying to escape through train windows and that bystanders had gathered to help them before rescuers arrived. The Puyuma was launched in 2013 to handle the very difficult topography of Taiwan's east coast and is distinct from the high-speed rail that runs on the west coast. The trains travel up to 150 kilometers (93 miles) per hour, faster than any other in Taiwan except for high-speed rail. The train that derailed is 6 years old and its most recent inspection and major maintenance took place in 2017, Taiwan Railways Administration Director Lu Chie-shen said at a televised news conference. Authorities are investigating the cause of the derailment.



Credibility of Saudi explanation for Khashoggi's killing questioned by US, Europe

Credibility of Saudi explanation for Khashoggi's killing questioned by US, EuropeABC News Senior Foreign Correspondent Ian Pannell reports from Istanbul on the latest in the investigation into the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.



Khaled El Mays's Beirut Abode Blurs The Line Between Home and Showroom

Khaled El Mays's Beirut Abode Blurs The Line Between Home and Showroom



5 Moments From Trump's Nevada Rally That Need A Fact Check

5 Moments From Trump's Nevada Rally That Need A Fact CheckContinuing his efforts to rally support for Republican candidates ahead of the



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