U.S. Homeland Security probes hacking of actress Leslie Jones' website

Cast member Leslie Jones poses at the premiere of the film "Ghostbusters" in Hollywood, CaliforniaThe U.S. Department of Homeland Security is investigating a new incident involving actress Leslie Jones, who has been targeted by online abusers, after hackers posted nude photos and personal information on the "Ghostbusters" star's website. In order to protect the integrity of the case, no further details are available at this time," Rachel Yong You, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said on Thursday in an email to Reuters. ICE, as the agency is known, is a branch of the Department of Homeland Security.



Apple fixes security flaw after UAE dissident's iPhone targeted

A salesman checks a customer's iPhone at a mobile phone store in New DelhiApple Inc issued a patch on Thursday to fix a dangerous security flaw in iPhones and iPads after researchers discovered that a prominent United Arab Emirates dissident's phone had been targeted with a previously unknown method of hacking. The thwarted attack on the human rights activist, Ahmed Mansoor, used a text message that invited him to click on a web link. Instead of clicking, he forwarded the message to researchers at the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab.



Russian lawmaker's son convicted in U.S. for hacking scheme

View shows various credit cardsRoman Seleznev, also known as "Track2," was found guilty by a federal jury in Seattle on 38 of 40 counts including wire fraud and intentional damage to a protected computer following an eight day trial, prosecutors said. The conviction of Seleznev, of Vladivostok, followed a 10-year-long investigation by the U.S. Secret Service, the agency said. Seleznev, the son of Valery Seleznev, a member of the Russian Parliament, is scheduled to be sentenced on Dec. 2.



Canada sees more extremists, including women, traveling abroad

Canada's Public Safety Minister Goodale speaks in the House of Commons in OttawaThe number of people who have traveled overseas from Canada and are suspected of involvement in radical activities has grown, security officials said in a report that found the number of women leaving to join Islamic State was also on the rise. At the end of 2015, 60 of what Canada calls "extremist travelers" had returned to the country, according to the annual report released on Thursday by Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale. Goodale has overall responsibility for law enforcement, including the RCMP and Canadian Security Intelligence Service.



Uber lost at least $1.27 billion in first half of 2016: Bloomberg

An illustration picture shows the logo of car-sharing service app Uber on a smartphone next to the picture of an official German taxi sign(Reuters) - Ride-hailing giant Uber Technologies Inc [UBER.UL] lost at least $1.27 billion before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization in the first six months of 2016, Bloomberg reported on Thursday, citing people familiar with the matter. The subsidies Uber grants its drivers was the main reason for the loss, finance head Gautam Gupta told investors in a quarterly conference call, Bloomberg said, citing sources. The company lost about $520 million in the first quarter of the year and another $750 million in the second quarter, Bloomberg said.



WhatsApp relaxes privacy stance, to share phone numbers with Facebook

A 3D printed Whatsapp logo is seen in front of a displayed Facebook logo in this illustration takenPopular messaging service WhatsApp said it would start sharing users' phone numbers with parent Facebook Inc , marking a notable shift in its stance on privacy. When Facebook bought WhatsApp in 2014, founder Jan Koum vowed to protect data of its users, saying the deal would not affect its privacy policy. The change in policy, WhatsApp's first since the deal, will allow for more relevant advertisements and friend recommendations on Facebook, according to a WhatsApp blog post.



Social media giants must do more to police sites - MPs

A logo of Twitter is pictured next to the logo of Facebook in this illustration photo in SarajevoBy Paul Sandle LONDON (Reuters) - Facebook, Twitter and YouTube should hire more people to monitor hate speech and material inciting violence as well as putting staff in police operation centres to remove offending posts faster, British lawmakers said. In a report released on Thursday by parliament's Home Affairs Select Committee, lawmakers said major internet firms were "consciously failing" to stop groups such as Islamic State promoting violence on social media and they needed to take more responsibility for the impact of material posted on their sites. The report said large internet companies should work with the government, police and security services to create an extensive round-the-clock hub to monitor and immediately shut down such online activity.



Social media giants must do more to police sites: UK lawmakers

A logo of Twitter is pictured next to the logo of Facebook in this illustration photo in SarajevoBy Paul Sandle LONDON (Reuters) - Facebook, Twitter and YouTube should hire more people to monitor hate speech and material inciting violence as well as putting staff in police operation centers to remove offending posts faster, British lawmakers said. In a report released on Thursday by parliament's Home Affairs Select Committee, lawmakers said major internet firms were "consciously failing" to stop groups such as Islamic State promoting violence on social media and they needed to take more responsibility for the impact of material posted on their sites. The report said large internet companies should work with the government, police and security services to create an extensive round-the-clock hub to monitor and immediately shut down such online activity.



Amazon launches Amazon Vehicles to help car buyers

Amazon.com's logo is seen at Amazon Japan's office building in Tokyo(Reuters) - Amazon.com on Thursday launched Amazon Vehicles, an online platform for users to research on cars, auto parts and accessories. The platform will include specifications, images and reviews on Amazon.com for a large number of car models, ranging from Tesla Motors' 2014 Model S to the iconic Ford Mustang 1965. Amazon Vehicles would be an extension of the existing Amazon Automotive store, the company said.



Uber to let Londoners book journeys weeks in advance

A photo illustration shows the Uber app logo displayed on a mobile telephone, as it is held up for a posed photograph in central LondonRide service Uber [UBER.UL], which enables users to instantly hail a taxi ride using their smartphone, will allow customers to book trips days or weeks in advance in London, the first European city to get the option. Uber began offering scheduled rides in June in Seattle, targeted particularly at business customers. Earlier this year, the San Francisco-based app avoided having a mandatory waiting time of five minutes imposed upon it and other private hire car firms in London as part of proposals by transport bosses to regulate the sector.



Tech firms' encryption foe struggles for U.S. Senate re-election

Senators hold a news conference to talk about new legislation to restrict prisoner transfers from the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, at the U.S. Capitol in WashingtonBy Dustin Volz WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. senator seen by Silicon Valley as one of the technology industry's main foes in Congress is fighting for his political life as Donald Trump's slumping poll numbers threaten to damage Republican candidates across the board. Senator Richard Burr from North Carolina, the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, is facing a strong and unexpected challenge from Democrat Deborah Ross. Ross, a former head of the state's chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, is fighting an uphill battle.



CrowdStrike, other cybersecurity firms integrating industry cooperative

A padlock is displayed at the Alert Logic booth during the 2016 Black Hat cyber-security conference in Las VegasBy Joseph Menn SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Some information security companies that were shut out of the leading system for sharing data on malicious software are revealing more about how their own systems work in hopes of rejoining the cooperative effort, a shift that should improve protections for customers throughout the industry. CrowdStrike, one of the most prominent young security companies threatened with exclusion from some shared services, said it has integrated part of its system for detecting malicious software with VirusTotal, the main industry repository for disclosing and rating risks of malware and suspect files. Alphabet Inc's Google runs the VirusTotal database so security professionals can share new examples of suspected malicious software and opinions on the danger they pose.



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