Ted Cruz’s Texas two-step: Hired gun for Google

When Google hired Ted CruzFacing an investigation in 2010, the Web behemoth turned to an unlikely ally for help.



Battling America’s other PTSD crisis

Keith DavisThe fight that started Keith Davis on a path to a new life began when he was buying marijuana. It was early afternoon on Aug. 8. As he tells it, he was in at his usual hangout in North Central Philadelphia, in front of an abandoned church at 18th and Ridge. He was taking too long mulling over his purchase, and another man got impatient and told him to go buy his stuff somewhere else.



Harrison Ford survives crash-landing on golf course

Officials stand near the scene of a small vintage airplane that crash-landed on the Penmar Golf Course in the Venice area of Los Angeles, Thursday, March 5, 2015. Harrison Ford crash-landed the airplane shortly after taking off from a nearby airport and reporting engine problems. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)LOS ANGELES (AP) — When a man battles Darth Vader, Nazis and other evil-doers for work, what does he do for fun? Harrison Ford's answer is found in a pilot's license and the freedom to take to the skies at will.



With a nod and a wink, Republicans build 2016 campaign machines

Governor Walker speaks at the 42nd annual Conservative Political Action ConferenceBy Emily Flitter NEW YORK (Reuters) - Asked last week about his agenda if elected, presumptive Republican presidential candidate Scott Walker began: "Should I choose to be a candidate..."     Then he added with a grin: "My lawyers love it when I say that."     Like the other would-be Republican candidates who took the stage over three days in Washington at the Conservative Political Action Conference, the Wisconsin governor studiously avoided mentioning any plans for the 2016 presidential election.     The pantomime is crucial – it allows candidates to work closely with their funding organizations to rake in big money donations without breaking campaign finance laws. Once they launch their campaign or even say they are “testing the waters", they face far tighter restrictions on their fundraising.



Winter storm moves away, eastern U.S. to remain cold

A worker clears snow on the Brooklyn bridge in New YorkA winter storm that dropped roughly two feet of snow (61 cm) on parts of the eastern United States is expected to move out to sea on Friday but the cold will remain. The National Weather Service warned of flooding and told commuters from the lower Mississippi valley to the mid-Atlantic to be wary of dangerous road conditions created by the snow, ice and slush. "Arctic air settling in behind the boundary will make for a chilly end to the work week," the National Weather Service said. In Kentucky, where cities were buried under as many as 23 inches (58 cm) of snow, Governor Steve Beshear declared a state of emergency on Thursday as traffic halted on interstate highways and motorists were left stranded.



Wisconsin Assembly slogs through debate on right-to-work bill; unions cry foul

A crowd of about 200 people and union members gather in frigid temperatures in downtown MilwaukeeBy Brendan O'Brien MADISON, Wis. (Reuters) - Weary Wisconsin lawmakers debated into the early hours of Friday a measure supported by Republican Governor Scott Walker that would stop private-sector workers from having to join a union or pay dues as a condition of employment. Opponents call the draft law a thinly disguised assault on organized labor that will drive down wages, and security staff had to clear the Assembly gallery on Thursday after protesters temporarily halted the debate with chants. Wisconsin would be the 25th state to enact such a law and Walker's history of pushing back against union rights has bolstered his credentials as an early favorite in the battle for the Republican nomination in the 2016 presidential election. "This is about freedom ... it's time for right-to-work in Wisconsin," said Republican Representative Dean Knudson.



Ky. interstates packed with stranded motorists after storm

Traffic backs up as more than 50 miles of Interstate 65 southbound is shut down from the weather, Thursday, March 5, 2015, near Mount Washington, Ky. Kentucky State Police reported that the interstate will not reopen until Thursday evening. Kentucky has been walloped by a winter storm that has dumped nearly 2 feet of snow in parts of the state. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)Thousands of stranded motorists endured agonizingly long waits Thursday lasting nearly 24 hours for some as a winter storm walloped Kentucky with up to 2 feet of snow and frustrated travelers dealt with gas tanks and stomachs close to empty.



Plane slides off runway at NYC airport

A firefighter and police officer view a Delta jet which skidded off the runway at LaGuardia airport in New YorkA jet carrying 125 passengers crashed into a fence while landing in snowstorm.



McConnell backs off clash with Democrats on Iran

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) returns to his office after a vote on whether to overturn a presidential veto of the Keystone XL pipeline, at the U.S. Capitol in WashingtonRepublican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday decided not to press ahead with a fast-tracked vote on Iran legislation in the face of Democratic opposition



Father tells jury about boy's death at Boston Marathon

Father tells jury about boy's death at Boston MarathonWith Dzhokhar Tsarnaev seated at the defense table no more than 15 feet away Thursday, the father of an 8-year-old boy killed in the Boston Marathon bombing described the moment when he looked down at his son's pale, torn body and realized he wouldn't make it.



Cardinal Egan, retired N.Y. archbishop, dies at age 82

FILE- In this Aug. 19, 2011 file photo, Cardinal Edward Egan speaks with a reporter during an interview in New York. Egan, who was Archbishop-Emeritus, 12th bishop and 9th archbishop and 7th Cardinal of the See of New York, died of cardiac arrest, Thursday, March 5, 2015, in New York. He was 82. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)Roman Catholic Cardinal Edward Egan, the former archbishop of New York, has died. He was 82.



Slain Missouri 18-year-old's parents plan wrongful death suit

Lesley McSpadden and Michael Brown Sr., the parents of slain teenager Michael Brown, attend an hearing of Committee against Torture at the United Nations in GenevaMichael Brown's parents will file a wrongful death civil lawsuit against Ferguson, Missouri and the white police officer who shot dead the unarmed 18-year-old black man last August in the St. Louis suburb, a family attorney said on Thursday. He did not have to kill Michael Brown," attorney Daryl Parks said of Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson. The announcement came a day after the U.S. Justice Department cleared Wilson of any civil rights violations in the shooting but said it found racial bias and a pattern of discriminatory and illegal actions against African-Americans by the Ferguson Police Department.



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