Tattoo artists may miss chance to help with skin cancer detection

An artist applies a tattoo on the leg of of a man in VirginiaBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Many tattoo artists may ink skin with moles or blemishes even though this can make cancer harder to detect, a recent study suggests. Just 43 percent of tattoo artists surveyed for the study said they had received training on how to handle skin with moles, spots or other skin lesions. About 55 percent of the tattoo artists said they had declined to ink skin with any of these visible abnormalities, but they were more apt to refuse for aesthetic reasons than out of concern for skin cancer, the study found.



Science: This Popular Food Additive Could Be Causing Cancer

Science: This Popular Food Additive Could Be Causing CancerHave you eaten titanium dioxide today? It’s a fairly common food additive, generally used to make whites brighter on food. Unfortunately, though, you might want to set aside the powdered donuts and alfredo sauce, as a new study finds that it’s causing cancer in rats.



Black women are dying of cervical cancer at twice the rate of white women, study shows

Black women are dying of cervical cancer at twice the rate of white women, study showsThere's a huge racial disparity when it comes to cervical cancer in the United States.  Black women are dying of the cancer at twice the rate of white women — with death numbers comparable to those of women in many developing countries, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Cancer.  Until now, doctors had thought the racial gap was narrowing, given that cervical cancer death rates for black women were dropping. The new study, however, found that the disparity is even larger than previously believed. SEE ALSO: Powerful portraits of LGBTQ women aim to raise breast cancer awareness "This is a preventable disease, and women should not be getting it, let alone dying from it," Anne Rositch, the lead author of the study and an assistant professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, said in a statement. "These findings motivate us to better understand why, despite the wide availability of screening and treatment, older and black women are still dying from cervical cancer at such high rates in the United States," she said. Image: U.S. centers for disease control and prevention Women can get cervical cancer if they are infected with certain types of Human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted infection. Of the more than 100 types of HPV, most are benign, but about a dozen can lead to cancer.  Through routine Pap smears, doctors can detect changes in the cervix before cancer develops, or spot the cancer early when it's still in its most curable stage. Girls ages 9 to 13 can also get an HPV vaccine for two of the most common cancer-causing strains. But many women — particularly poor women of color — still don't have access to basic, quality screenings, either because such services aren't offered locally or are too expensive, or because women lack the necessary insurance. Cervical cancer kills about 4,000 women in the U.S. and 270,000 women globally, according to recent estimates. A nurse holds up a vial and box for the HPV vaccine, brand name Gardasil. Image: AP Photo/Daily Free Press, Charles Buchanan Some doctors said they worry access to services could shrink even further under the Trump administration, given the expected repeal of the Affordable Care Act and likely funding cuts for family planning clinics, which provide inexpensive screenings. "We have screenings that are great, but many women in America are not getting them. And now I have even more concerns going forward," Dr. Kathleen Schmeler of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, who was not involved with Monday's study, told the New York Times . The new research doesn't mean that more women are dying from cervical cancer in the U.S.  Instead, the epidemiologists changed the way they calculated the death rates to give a more accurate analysis of health data from 2000 to 2012. The study found that, among black women over the age of 20, the rate of cervical cancer deaths was 10.1 deaths per 100,000 individuals per year. For white women, the rate was 4.7 deaths per 100,000 women.  Earlier studies put the rates at 5.7 for black women and 3.2 for white women.  A pathologist from Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota., explains a Pap test slide to a patient at North Point Health & Wellness Center's See, Test & Treat program. Image: Craig Lassig /AP Images for College of American Pathologists The new figures are substantially higher because the researchers did not include women who had their uterus and cervix removed — a step that eliminated their risk of developing cervical cancer. Black women are more likely to have had this surgery than white women, since black women are more susceptible to having benign fibroid masses form in the uterus.   As a result, previous calculations underestimated the racial disparity in death rates between black and white women by 44 percent, the epidemiologists found. The study does not explain the exact reasons why older and black women are dying at higher rates from cervical cancer. Perhaps patients didn't get a proper screening, or there wasn't a follow-up exam after an abnormal screening test, or the treatment was ineffective, the researchers suggested. "While trends over time show that the racial disparities gap has been closing somewhat, these data emphasize that it should remain a priority area," Rositch said. "We need to put in place measures to reverse the [racial] trend." BONUS: This medical device eliminates the most painful thing about needles



Cervical cancer gene discovery may boost remedy quest

Cervical cancer gene discovery may boost remedy questCervical cancer comes in subtypes, said a study Monday that may boost the quest for life-saving treatments for a disease experts said is killing more women than previously thought. Gene analysis of some 200 cancers found that several were unrelated to the human papillomavirus (HPV), previously thought to cause virtually all cases of cervical cancer, it added. This meant some cervical cancers may have "strictly genetic" causes, which could be targeted with personalised immunotherapy, said the study authors.



Researchers credit Obamacare with helping find early-stage cancer

FILE PHOTO - Applications are seen at a rally held by supporters of the Affordable Care Act in Jackson MississippiBy Ronnie Cohen (Reuters Health) - The Affordable Care Act likely extended the lives of thousands of seniors who took advantage of free screening exams and were diagnosed with treatable, early-stage colorectal cancer, a new study suggests. “I think the prevention-related provisions of the Affordable Care Act helped to detect cancer at earlier and more treatable stages and eventually will save lives,” said senior author Nengliang “Aaron” Yao, a health-policy professor at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville. Before the Affordable Care Act, often called Obamacare, took effect, people ages 65 and older who were insured under Medicare had to pay $275 for colonoscopies, the report in Health Affairs says.



87-year-old hospice patient asks doctors to let her live until Women's March

87-year-old hospice patient asks doctors to let her live until Women's MarchSaturday's Women's March saw women and men of all ages and colors united across the globe, fighting for their voices to be heard. 87-year-old hospice patient Mary Tanasse, the matriarch of her family, was not going to miss the opportunity to march with her children and grandchildren in Olympia, Washington, despite having terminal cancer.  SEE ALSO: Across the globe, nasty women and men hit the streets one day after Trump's inauguration  87-year-old Mary asked her hospice: "Please let me live until this march." She explains why today is so important to her, via @ElisaHahnK5 pic.twitter.com/tmKxSCKLfy — KING 5 News (@KING5Seattle) January 22, 2017 She asked her doctors and nurses to help her cross this march off her bucket list.  "I asked them 'Please let me live until this march' because it was so important for me to model what I feel is right for my family", Mary said to Seattle, Washington's, King 5 news.  And they did. Mary proudly marched alongside friends and family on a day they won't soon forget. "I made it and it's a beautiful day", she said. "I praise God and hopefully the nation will make an impact so we'll all be heard." Girl power.   [H/T: KING 5 News ] BONUS: Across the globe, nasty women and men hit the streets one day after Trump's inauguration



UK scientists give cancer risk warning on overdone chips, toast

FILE PHOTO: French fries in HollywoodBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Potatoes and bread cooked at high temperatures for a long time could increase the risk of cancer in people who eat them regularly, British government scientists said on Monday. The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) said a substance called acrylamide, produced when starchy foods are roasted, fried or grilled for too long at high temperatures, has been found in animal studies to increase the risk of cancer. In a statement that drew criticism from some independent experts, the FSA said that, to reduce the danger, consumers should cook these foods at lower temperatures and eat them when they are cooked to a golden colour rather than browned.



Nearly Half of US Men Have Genital HPV Infections

New Prostate Cancer Screening Rules Fail to Curb PSA TestingNearly half of American men have a genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, but a much smaller percentage have received the HPV vaccine, according to a new study. The results show that about 45 percent of U.S. men under age 60 have a genital HPV infection, which translates to about 35 million men, the researchers said. What's more, 25 percent of men were infected with so-called "high-risk" types of HPV, which, compared with low-risk types of HPV, are more strongly linked with cancer.



Britons sizzle over chips and toast cancer warnings

Britons sizzle over chips and toast cancer warningsA government health warning over the potential dangers of toast, roast potatoes and chips -- all traditional staples of the British diet -- had the country's tabloids hitting out Monday. The Food Standards Agency (FSA) said acrylamide -- a chemical substance formed when foods with high starch content are cooked at very high temperatures -- "has the potential to cause cancer in humans". "Health officials say burning starchy foods such as spuds, bread and pizza dough may increase the risks -- despite no study proving the link," it said.



UK scientists give cancer risk warning on overdone chips, toast
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Potatoes and bread cooked at high temperatures for a long time could increase the risk of cancer in people who eat them regularly, British government scientists said on Monday. The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) said a substance called acrylamide, produced when starchy foods are roasted, fried or grilled for too long at high temperatures, has been found in animal studies to increase the risk of cancer. In a statement that drew criticism from some independent experts, the FSA said that, to reduce the danger, consumers should cook these foods at lower temperatures and eat them when they are cooked to a golden color rather than browned.

Britons sizzle over chips and toast cancer warnings

The Food Standards Agency said acrylamide -- a chemical substance formed when foods with high starch content are cooked at very high temperatures -- "has the potential to cause cancer in humans"A government health warning over the potential dangers of toast, roast potatoes and chips -- all traditional staples of the British diet -- had the country's tabloids hitting out Monday. The Food Standards Agency (FSA) said acrylamide -- a chemical substance formed when foods with high starch content are cooked at very high temperatures -- "has the potential to cause cancer in humans". "Health officials say burning starchy foods such as spuds, bread and pizza dough may increase the risks -- despite no study proving the link," it said.



Rachel Carson doc tells the environmentalist's inspiring life story

Rachel Carson doc tells the environmentalist's inspiring life storyBefore Rachel Carson became the mother of the modern environmental movement, she was stuck in a job that paid the bills but left her restless. A new documentary revisits Carson's days as an information specialist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the 1930s and '40s, where at first she filed mundane reports about the agency's conservation work.  It was in that role that Carson learned about DDT — a potent pesticide that farmers sprayed indiscriminately over their crops. Carson exposed the chemical's widespread environmental damage in her groundbreaking 1962 book, Silent Spring.  SEE ALSO: Hawaii's bees are now protected under U.S. Endangered Species Act Her work inspired President John F. Kennedy to launch the first U.S. investigation into the public health risks of pesticides, which later prompted policymakers to create new safeguards for protecting the environment.  The PBS documentary Rachel Carson draws on the biologist's own writings, letters and recent scholarship to tell her inspiring life story. The film features the voice of actress Mary-Louise Parker as Carson, who died in 1964 after a long battle with breast cancer. Rachel Carson premieres as part of PBS' American Experience program on Jan. 24 at 8 p.m. ET. Relatable cat is not at all shy about wanting a snack Matthew McConaughey has a great story about his dad winning a motorbike A day in the life of a pianist Ed Sheeran flashes back to his teen years in 'Castle On The Hill' video



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