Clinton says hopes Iran talks yield deal in the next week

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Virginia Democratic Party's annual Jefferson-Jackson party fundraising dinnerBy Amanda Becker HANOVER, N.H. (Reuters) - Democratic presidential contender Hillary Clinton said on Friday she hoped 18 months of nuclear talks between Iran and major powers would yield a deal in coming days to curb Iran's nuclear program. The groundwork for the talks was laid when Clinton was U.S. Secretary of State and she had not commented recently on the negotiations as she seeks the Democratic Party nomination to run in the November 2016 presidential election. "I so hope that we are able to get a deal in the next week that puts a lid on Iran's nuclear weapons program," Clinton told a rally on the Dartmouth College campus in Hanover, New Hampshire.



Hispanic leaders want GOP field to condemn Trump's 'idiocy'

Vicente Mayorga, left, holds a sign next to Dominican immigrant Angela Lopez, front center, of Long Island, N.Y., as she stands with her sons Gabriel, left, and Adrian in front of Macy's Herald Square flagship store, Wednesday, July 1, 2015, in New York. Lopez and Mayorga joined other immigrants and politicians in calling on corporations and businesses to boycott presidential candidate Donald Trump after his remarks about Mexican immigrants. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)WASHINGTON (AP) — Hispanic leaders are bristling at the largely tepid response by Republican presidential candidates to Donald Trump's characterization of Mexican immigrants as rapists and drug dealers.



Clinton says she takes a 'backseat to no one' among liberals

Louisa Hill, 3, front right, walks onto the stage as Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a campaign event, Friday, July 3, 2015, in Hanover, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)HANOVER, N.H. (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton said Friday she takes a "backseat to no one" on championing liberal causes, presenting herself as a standard-bearer for Democrats as primary challenger Bernie Sanders generates large, energetic crowds.



Iran to US: Nuke deal could result in joint cooperation

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, centre, Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, left, and Hossein Fereydoon, brother and close aide to President Hassan Rouhani, meet with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Vienna, Austria, Friday July 3, 2015. Iran has committed to implementing the IAEA's "additional protocol" for inspections and monitoring as part of an accord, but the rules don't guarantee international monitors can enter any facility including sensitive military sites, so making it difficult to investigate allegations of secret work on nuclear weapons. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)VIENNA (AP) — In a message to Washington, Iran's foreign minister on Friday called for an end to "coercion and pressure" at the nuclear talks, suggesting a deal acceptable to his country will open the door to cooperation on fighting the upsurge of Middle East extremism threatening both nations' interests.



Empathy: Overrated?

Empathy: Overrated?In 2006, then-senator Barack Obama gave a commencement speech offering what seemed like very sensible advice. In the years since then, the country has followed Obama’s counsel, at least when it comes to talking about empathy. Bad idea, say cognitive psychologist Paul Bloom and neuroscientist Richard J. Davidson.



Rubio, Christie planning sleepover with the Romneys
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — 2012 GOP nominee Mitt Romney will be hosting two rival Republican presidential contenders at a holiday sleepover Friday evening.

Clinton warns GOP will repeal Obamacare
HANOVER, N.H. (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton is warning New Hampshire voters that if the country elects a Republican president, the next administration will repeal President Barack Obama's health care overhaul.

U.S. pushes China on ivory trade, wildlife NGOs

Carved pieces of confiscated ivory are placed out to be crushed in New York's Times SquareBy Megha Rajagopalan BEIJING (Reuters) - A senior U.S. official told China on Friday that its legal imports of ivory act as a loophole for illegal traders, and that it needs to understand the importance of wildlife NGOs. China signed a pact banning global trade in ivory in 1981, but it got an exemption in 2008 to buy 62 tonnes of ivory from several African nations. It releases a portion of that stockpile each year to government-licensed ivory carving factories.



JetBlue launches New York-to-Havana charter flights

An airport worker leads JetBlue planes onto the tarmac of the John F. Kennedy International Airport in New YorkThe airline said Cuba Travel Services Inc is offering the weekly flight on Fridays between New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport and Havana's Jose Marti International Airport. It did not say how much the trip would cost.



How Obama reversed course on federal college ratings

President Barack Obama arrives to speak at the University of Wisconsin at La Crosse, in La Crosse, Wis., Thursday, July 2, 2015, about the economy and to promote a proposed Labor Department rule that would make more workers eligible for overtime. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama dearly wanted to get the government in the business of rating colleges and universities based on value and affordability, promising a new system by 2015. Now that goal is shriveling under the weight of a concerted opposition from universities, lawmakers and bureaucrats in Obama's own administration.



Obama to host head of Vietnam communist party

Vietnam Communist Party's Secretary General Nguyen Phu Trong (pictured centre) will meet US President Barack Obama at the White House next weekThe head of Vietnam's Communist Party will make a first-ever visit to the White House next week, meeting President Barack Obama on the 40th anniversary of the end of the war between the two nations. The landmark trip underscores strengthening ties between the former wartime enemies amid regional maritime tensions involving China. Nguyen Phu Trong will become the first General Secretary of the Vietnamese Communist Party to visit the United States and the White House, diplomats and officials said.



In Supreme Court term, Obama wins big and loses small

Supporters of gay marriage rally after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Friday that the U.S. Constitution provides same-sex couples the right to marryBy Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama's administration was unexpectedly on the winning side in nearly all the close, politically significant Supreme Court cases decided in the term that ended this week, including blockbuster rulings on Obamacare and gay marriage. The run of victories ran counter to the administration's recent mixed record. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli, the Democratic administration's top Supreme Court advocate, and his team of Justice Department lawyers successfully defended Obama's signature healthcare law from a conservative legal challenge and argued on the winning side of the court's ruling legalizing gay marriage nationwide.



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